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10.08.2019 07:36
ST. [url=http://www.nuggetsproshop.com/Carmelo-Anthony-Nuggets-Jersey/]Carme lo Anthony Nuggets Jersey[/url] . PETERSBURG, Fla. - Antworten

ST. Carmelo Anthony Nuggets Jersey . PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Tampa Bay Rays right-hander Alex Cobb favours pitchers having the option of wearing protective headgear on the mound. Cobb returned to Tropicana Field on Monday, nine days after being struck in the right ear by a ball hit by Kansas Citys Eric Hosmer and nearly seven weeks after Torontos J.A. Happ also was hit in the head by a batted ball while pitching there. Sitting on a platform in the auxiliary clubhouse in which Happ also answered questions about the scary incident that knocked him out of a game in early May, Cobb -- who is making progress in his recovery, spoke to the media for the first time since being carted off the field and taken to a hospital on June 15. Cobb, like Happ, was released from Bayfront Medical Center less than 24 hours later. "I remember deciding what pitch to throw. ... I remember seeing the ball come back," said Cobb, who is out indefinitely with a concussion. "Might have caught a glance of the ball and subconsciously turned my head, thankfully." The injury renewed debate about what can be done to protect pitchers from batted balls. "Even after J.A. Happ went through this, we were asked pretty heavily about this topic. I came right out and thought there should be something for us to have the option to do," Cobb said. "I dont want it to turn into something where every pitcher on the mound has to wear something. Thats everybodys personal choice," Cobb added. "Its one where you want to have a little say-so that if this incident happened again you were able to do everything you could to protect yourself, your future, your family." Cobb, who remained conscious the whole time, said he has experienced nausea, severe headaches that have begun to subside, as well as symptoms of vertigo. Still, he is beginning to feel better each day. "Im having my days," the 25-year-old Cobb said. "Today has been the best day by far." Cobb said he visited the doctor Monday and was told he is healing quicker than expected. There is still no timetable for him to return to the mound. "Thats something you just have to let play out," Rays manager Joe Maddon said before Tampa Bay opened a three-game series against the Blue Jays, who are still without Happ. "I dont like to apply finish lines to items that I really have no clue (about). I dont think anybody does," Maddon said. "Even if you talk to doctors, Im sure theyre not sure how long its going to take. ... So just let it play out. "Hell let us know when hes ready for that next moment, and well take it from there." After initially being reluctant to watch a replay of the line drive, Cobb said he watched it later that night or the following morning. He said he initially thought the injury wasnt that serious, and wanted to get up and walk off the field. It wasnt until after the ambulance ride to the hospital, where he later overheard a nurse talking about, "how she couldnt believe this is happening again within a month" that he began to think about Happ. "When it happened I didnt think it was too big of a deal. ... It didnt sink in for a while," Cobb said. "Once I got the CATSCAN going and they told me there was no bleeding inside the brain, from there I was kind of at ease with the whole situation." There has been speculation that Cobb, who is 6-2 with a 3.01 ERA in 13 starts this year, might not pitch again this season. He said that isnt true. "Ill be ready to go as soon as my body tells me Im 100 per cent," he said. "But mentally, theres no doubt in my mind Ill be fine. Its just another challenge." He conceded, though, that it is difficult to imagine what it will be like when he does finally get back on a mound and faces hitters. "I dont think thats something you can say until you actually go through it," Cobb said. "Id love to sit up here and tell you no, that once I get out there Ill have the mindset that it happened once, its probably a pretty good chance its not going to happen to me again. "But Im not going to lie. Ive had some nightmares about how bad it could have been. Its obviously in the back of my mind, but Id like to think I could pitch through it." Tyler Lydon Nuggets Jersey . Gough finished in fourth, 0.433 seconds behind American Erin Hamlin, who took the bronze medal at the Sanki Sliding Center in Rzhanaya Polyana. Gary Harris Jersey .J. Hardy to avoid a three-game sweep after blowing a big early lead. Odour had a leadoff single in the seventh and scored the tiebreaking run with the help of two errors by Hardy as the Rangers went on to beat the Orioles 8-6 on Thursday night. http://www.nuggetsproshop.com/Alex-English-Nuggets-Jersey/ .The ruling takes effect on Jan. 1 and stems from the debate surrounding Paralympic champion Markus Rehm, an amputee who won the national long jump title competing with a carbon-fiber prosthesis.COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. - Frank Thomas choked back tears, Joe Torre apologized for leaving people out of his speech and Tony La Russa said he felt uneasy. Being enshrined in the Hall of Fame can have those effects, even on the greats. Thomas, pitchers Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux, and managers Bobby Cox, Torre and La Russa were inducted into the baseball shrine Sunday, and all paid special tribute to their families before an adoring crowd of nearly 50,000. "Im speechless. Thanks for having me in your club," Thomas said, getting emotional as he remembered his late father. "Frank Sr., I know youre watching. Without you, I know 100 per cent I wouldnt be here in Cooperstown today. You always preached to me, You can be someone special if you really work at it. I took that to heart, Pop." "Mom, I thank you for all the motherly love and support. I know it wasnt easy." The 46-year old Thomas, the first player elected to the Hall who spent more than half of his time as a designated hitter, batted .301 with 521 home runs and 1,704 RBIs in a 19-year career mostly with the Chicago White Sox. Hes the only player in major league history to log seven straight seasons with a .300 average, 20 homers, 100 RBIs and 100 walks. Ever the diplomat as a manager, Torre somehow managed to assuage the most demanding of owners in George Steinbrenner, maintaining his coolness amid all the Bronx craziness while keeping all those egos in check after taking over in 1996. The result: 10 division titles, six AL pennants and four World Series triumphs in 12 years as he helped restore the lustre to baseballs most successful franchise and resurrected his own career after three firings. Torre, the only man to amass more than 2,000 hits (2,342) and win more than 2,000 games as a manager, was last to speak, and in closing delivered a familiar message. "Baseball is a game of life. Its not perfect, but it feels like it is," said the 74-year-old Torre, who apologized afterward for forgetting to include the Steinbrenner family in his speech. "Thats the magic of it. We are responsible for giving it the respect it deserves. Our sport is part of the American soul, and its ours to borrow — just for a while." "If all of us who love baseball and are doing our jobs, then those who get the game from us will be as proud to be a part of it as we were. And we are. This game is a gift, and I am humbled, very humbled, to accept its greatest honour." The day was a reunion of sorts for the city of Atlanta. Glavine, Maddux and Cox were part of a remarkable run of success by the Braves. They won an unprecedented 14 straight division titles and made 15 playoff appearances, winning the citys lone major professional sports title. "Im truly humbled to stand here before you," Coox said. Malik Beasley Jersey. "To Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux, and I have to mention the third member of the big three — John Smoltz — I can honestly say I would not be standing here if it werent for you guys." Smoltz, part of the MLB Network telecast of the event and eligible for induction next year, flashed a smile in return for the compliment. Glavine was on the mound when the Braves won Game 6 to clinch the 1995 World Series, pitching one-hit ball over eight innings in a 1-0 victory over Cleveland. And the slender lefty was one of those rare athletes, drafted by the Braves and the Los Angeles Kings of the National Hockey League. "I had a difficult choice to make, and as a left-handed pitcher I thought that was the thing that would set me apart and make baseball the smartest decision," Glavine said. "Of course, I always wondered what would have happened had I taken up hockey." "In my mind, since I was drafted ahead of two Hall of Famers in Luc Robitaille and Brett Hull, that obviously means I would have been a Hall of Famer in hockey, too," Glavine chuckled as the crowd cheered. "But Im positive I made the right choice." The 48-year-old Maddux went 355-227 with a career ERA of 3.16 in 23 seasons with the Braves, Cubs, Padres and Dodgers and ranks eighth on the career wins list. He won four straight Cy Young Awards in the 1990s and won 15 or more games for 17 straight seasons with his pinpoint control. "I spent 12 years in Chicago, 11 in Atlanta, and both places are very special," Maddux said. "Without the experiences in both cities, I would not be standing here today." La Russa, who ranks third in career victories as a manager with 2,728, behind only Connie Mack and John McGraw, was chosen manager of the year four times and won 12 division titles, six pennants and three World Series titles in stints with the White Sox, Oakland As and St. Louis Cardinals. La Russa spoke from the heart. There was no written speech. "Its uncomfortable because I didnt make it as a player. Not even close," said La Russa, who made his big league debut as a teenage infielder with the 1963 Kansas City Athletics and appeared in just 132 games over six seasons, hitting .199 with no home runs. "Since December, I have not been comfortable with it. Theres no way to mention everybody, and that bothers me." "From managing parts of two years in the minor leagues, after thinking about all the other young managers who paid a lot of dues in the minor leagues and I get a chance and then I go into the big leagues with three organizations," he said. "All that equates to me is Im very, very fortunate. Ive never put my arms around the fact that being really lucky is a Hall of Fame credential." ' ' '

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